Read my latest article: 8 things I look for in a Ruby on Rails app (posted Thu, 06 Jul 2017 17:59:00 GMT)

Howdy Rip!

Posted by Thu, 11 Jun 2009 17:35:00 GMT

Chris Wanstrath (@defunkt) just posted the following on twitter.

“Hello Rip – http://hellorip.com/

The Rip project describes itself as, “an attempt to create a next generation packaging system for Ruby.”

One of the cool features is that it supports multiple environments. For example, you can have different Rip environments (with different gem versioning) that are targeted towards specific applications. I have to dig around more through the project, but this looks fascinating.

Check it out at http://hellorip.com/

I’m also curious as to how you think you might be able to start using this.

20 articles on Cucumber and a free beverage recipe!

Posted by Fri, 10 Apr 2009 03:22:00 GMT

Cucumber has been getting quite a bit of attention in the community and with the new RSpec Book on nearing publication, I predict that by this time next year, it’ll become a household word like boanthropy.

What is Cucumber?

The Cucumber project describes itself as a suite that, “lets software development teams describe how software should behave in plain text. The text is written in a business-readable domain-specific language and serves as documentation, automated tests and development-aid – all rolled into one format.

One of the great things about Cucumber is that it can be used to test applications in any language. I haven’t been able to track down a lot of articles of how people are using it with other languages, so please comment if you’re aware of some.

In any event, I’ve been collecting and reading resources from a variety of Cucumber aficionados and thought I’d share some links with you. To round it out, I asked on twitter for some others so that I could hit twenty. :-)

  1. What’s in a Story?, Dan North
  2. Telling a good story – Rspec stories from the trenches, Joseph Wilk
  3. Beginning with Cucumber, Ryan Bates (Railscasts)
  4. Using RSpec, Cucumber and User stories to build our internal systems, Rahoul Baruah
  5. Cucumber: The Latest in Ruby Testing, Ruby Inside
  6. Using Cucumber for Acceptance Testing, Noel Rappin
  7. Behavior Driven Development with Cucumber, Brandon Keepers (presentation/slides)
  8. Testing capistrano recipes with cucumber, Jeff Dean
  9. Using Cucumber to Integrate Distributed Systems and Test Messaging, Ben Mabey
  10. Tutorial: How to install/setup Cucumber, Alan Mitchell
  11. Testing outbound emails with Cucumber, Dr. Nic Willians
  12. Proper Cucumber Sintatra Driving, Chris Strom
  13. On getting started using Cucumber for .NET
  14. DRY up your Cucumber Steps, Matt Wynne
  15. Cucumber, Celerity, & FireWatir, Aidy Lewis (presentation/video)
  16. Cucumber step definition tip: Stubbing time, Bryan Helmkamp
  17. Story Driven Development Recipes with Cucumber, Sebastien Auvray
  18. Testing Facebook with Cucumber, Brandon Keepers
  19. Testing with the help of machinist, forgery, cucumber, webrat and rspec, Etienne van Tonder
  20. Integration testing SSL with Cucumber
  21. Continuous Integration Blueprints: How to Build an Army of Killer Robots With Hudson and Cucumber

So.. there you have it. Please post comments with links to any useful articles not mentioned and I’ll try to keep the list updated.

Also, be sure to check out the list of tutorials and related blog posts on the cucumber wiki (github).

FREE RECIPE: Cucumber Water

And now…for the reason you are all here! If you like cucumbers (eating them)... I would highly recommend heading to your local farmers market and purchasing some cucumbers. Aside from being healthy to eat… they can help make a tasty beverage.

Then do the following…

  • Chop several slices of a cucumber
  • Fill a pitcher with cold water and ice
  • Toss in slices of cucumber
  • Stir and leave in fridge for a while
  • Take out of fridge, pour into cup…
  • Drink… hack… and enjoy

Be sure to check out, How to Make Cucumber Water on wikihow for details.

Happy Hacking!

Related Posts (by me)

Rolling out new updates for Rails Boxcar

Posted by Thu, 29 Jan 2009 05:30:00 GMT

Alex, Director of Deployment Services, has been hard at work helping us get our new suite of hosting plans out for Rails Boxcar, a deployment environment that we’ve designed to help you get your Ruby on Rails applications running as painless and quickly as possible. With this new announcement, we’ve rebuilt the Boxcar image based on the feedback of our existing customers.

Additionally, we’ve been looking over some of early results from the Ruby on Rails Hosting in 2009 Survey that we’ve been running the past few weeks, which has further boosted our confidence that we’re on the right track with this big change.

What are some of the changes?

This means that with a Rails Boxcar, you can now get a pre-configured deployment environment using some of the most efficient platforms for hosting your Ruby on Rails applications. (REE has shown to increase performance by 33% in some cases)

We’re really excited about this new setup and would like to invite you all to check out our new plans and send us any questions that you might have.

Take the Ruby on Rails Hosting in 2009 Survey

Posted by Tue, 13 Jan 2009 18:40:00 GMT

Calling all Ruby on Rails developers and system administrators.

The team at Planet Argon is hoping to collect some information about how everyone is currently managing the deployment and hosting of their Ruby on Rails applications. We are inviting you all to participate in the Rails Hosting in 2009 survey, which consists of nearly forty questions about you and your Rails hosting experiences. Most people say it is taking less than five (5) minutes to complete it. =)

We will collect responses for the survey until the end of January and will then publish the results (with anonymous raw data) for everyone in the community to share and use.

Our goal is to use this information ourselves to continue to evolve our hosting-related products and deployment services for you. We also want all of our fellow hosting providers and development teams to have access to this information so that they can continue to improve their services. Rails deployment and hosting is getting easier for us all, but we know that there is always room from improvement.

We make an effort to keep our ear close to the ground in the community to listen for trends and problems, but sometimes it’s better to just ask directly.

So, if you have a few minutes to spare, please take the survey!

update: some people mentioned that we should have made some options multi-select. it’s too late to change it without losing submissions. so, for questions like: Monit, God, or Other (and you’re using God and Monit, put that in Other and we’ll track them accordingly)

P.S. Please spread the word about the survey!

Get to know a gem: Ghost

Posted by Mon, 12 Jan 2009 06:18:00 GMT

In my last post, Subdomain accounts with Ruby on Rails explaind, I mentioned that you’d need to modify your /etc/hosts file to use custom subdomains for development/testing. Apparently, there is a much better way to handle this that I was introduced to by Nathan de Vries. Nathan suggests using a gem that I hadn’t heard of before that bares the name of Ghost (view project on github).

Ghost describes itself as…

“A gem that allows you to create, list, and modify local hostnames in 10.5 with ease…”—

If you’ve ever had to modify your /etc/hosts file for anything local, I highly encourage you to check out this shiny gem.

Installing Ghost

Like most gems, you can just install Ghost with the following command.


~ : sudo gem install ghost
Password:
Successfully installed ghost-0.1.2-universal-darwin-9
1 gem installed
Installing ri documentation for ghost-0.1.2-universal-darwin-9...
Installing RDoc documentation for ghost-0.1.2-universal-darwin-9...

Okay, now that Ghost is installed, let’s see what we can do with it.

Using Ghost for local domains/subdomains

Ghost is fairly straight forward. It’s essentially a friendly wrapper for dscl, which is the Directory Service command line utility for Mac OS X. I’ve never played with that directly, but it seems that with Ghost… I shouldn’t need to. :-)

With Ghost, you can add, modify, and delete entries in the Directory Service by issuing any of the following commands. Let’s start out by running ghost to see what we have here.


 ~ : ghost
USAGE: ghost add <hostname> [<ip=127.0.1.1>]
       ghost modify <hostname> <ip>
       ghost delete <hostname>
       ghost list
       ghost empty

Okay, let’s see if there is anything already listed.


   ~ : ghost list
  Listing 0 host(s):

Nope. Let’s test this out. First, we’ll try to ping a domain name that we hope doesn’t exist.


   ~ : ping bigbrown.cow
  ping: cannot resolve bigbrown.cow: Unknown host  

Alright, now we’ll add bigbrown.cow with ghost.


   ~ : ghost add bigbrown.cow
  Password:
    [Adding] bigbrown.cow -> 127.0.0.1

As you can see, it required root credentials to do this as it’s system-wide. Let’s now see if we can talk to bigbrown.cow.


   ~ : ping bigbrown.cow     
  PING bigbrown.cow (127.0.0.1): 56 data bytes
  64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.047 ms
  64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.035 ms
  ^C
  --- bigbrown.cow ping statistics ---
  2 packets transmitted, 2 packets received, 0% packet loss
  round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 0.035/0.041/0.047/0.006 ms

Excellent! If we run ghost list again, we should see this record.


~ : ghost list
Listing 1 host(s):
  bigbrown.cow -> 127.0.0.1

We can modify the record to a non-localhost IP as well with ghost modify.


   ~ : ghost modify bigbrown.cow 192.168.10.104
    [Modifying] bigbrown.cow -> 192.168.10.104
   ~ : ghost list
  Listing 1 host(s):
    bigbrown.cow -> 192.168.10.104  

I’ll let you play with it yourself as there isn’t much to it. This is a great little addition to my development environment. Thanks to Nathan for pointing it out and to Bodaniel Jeanes for creating this useful gem.

Interviewed by Database Radio Podcast

Posted by Thu, 11 Dec 2008 17:46:00 GMT

Bob Zurek, the Chief Technology Officer at EnterpriseDB interviewed me a few months ago for their new Database Radio podcast. It finally was published last week. Bob and I had a nice conversation about PostgreSQL and it’s community, our use of PostgreSQL with Ruby, Ruby on Rails, and development tools/methods.

Database Radio | EnterpriseDB

You can listen to the podcast mp3 and/or read the transcript.

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