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Launch your own RubyURL

Posted by Sun, 02 Mar 2008 00:31:00 GMT

A few weeks ago, I moved RubyURL from subversion to git. During that process, I decided to use my invite to GitHub and have decided to go ahead and open up the source code.

It’s currently a whopping 92 LOC with a 1:2.5 code to spec ratio. (I had a goal to keep is below 100 LOC)

Feel free to grab it and help contribute. This has served almost 14 million redirects since August 2007 and is running on a Rails Boxcar.

To grab it with git.. run: git clone git://github.com/robbyrussell/rubyurl.git.

Feel free to submit tickets to the Rubyurl ticket system.

Enjoy!

UPDATE Ryan McGeary was kind enough to be the first person to help track down a bug and submit patches. :-)

RubyURL through QuickSilver

Posted by Mon, 07 Jan 2008 02:42:00 GMT

When Chris Griffin saw this post, he wanted to do the same with RubyURL. Since the ShortURL gem was broken, I didn’t get a chance to dive into it. However, with the shorturl command now working again with RubyURL, we get QuickSilver and RubyURL working together really quickly.

First, you’ll need a recent version of the ShortURL gem installed.

sudo gem install shorturl

Then you will want to add the following to ~/Library/Scripts/rubyurl.scpt. You will need to create this file.


  #
  # Change accordingly if shorturl is not under /usr/bin/shorturl
  #
  set shorturl_cmd to "/opt/local/bin/shorturl" 

  tell application "Safari" 
      set original_url to URL of front document
  end tell

  set cmd to shorturl_cmd & " " & original_url

  set ruby_url to do shell script cmd
  set the clipboard to ruby_url as text
  beep

Then you can add this script to run through QuickSilver. For details, jump to the setup process on this post.

rubyurl quicksilver
Uploaded with plasq’s Skitch!

This will make it much easier to paste RubyURLs into my Twitter client, IRC, etc.

I’ll try to post a more thorough tutorial soon, but wanted to share in the meantime.

ShortURL 0.8.4 released and gets a new mainainer... me!

Posted by Mon, 07 Jan 2008 00:49:00 GMT

Earlier today, Vincent Foley was kind enough to hand over maitenance of the the ShortURL project on RubyForge to me. He first released it back in 2005, which I blogged about as RubyURL was the first shortening service that it supported (and is the default). Unfortunately, the release of RubyURL 2.0 broke backwards compatibility and Vincent wasn’t maintaining it anymore. So, earlier, I decided to patch this and got a new version released that now works with the current RubyURL site.

While working on the code, I decided to extend the compatible services to include moourl and urlTea.

These updates are available in ShortURL version 0.8.4.

Install the ShortURL gem

Installation is a snap… (like 99.7% of rubygems…)


  ~ > sudo gem install shorturl                                                                                                                                                                                                           Password:

  Successfully installed shorturl-0.8.4
  1 gem installed
  Installing ri documentation for shorturl-0.8.4...
  Installing RDoc documentation for shorturl-0.8.4.  

Using ShortURL

The ShortURL gem provides the ShortURL library, which you can use from any Ruby application.

Using the ShortURL library


  ~ > irb                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
  irb(main):001:0> require 'rubygems'
  => true
  irb(main):002:0> require 'shorturl'
  => true
  irb(main):003:0> ShortURL.shorten( 'http://www.istwitterdown.com' )
  => "http://rubyurl.com/P9w" 

As you can see…it’s really straight forward.

Let’s try it with a few other services.


irb(main):004:0> ShortURL.shorten( 'http://www.istwitterdown.com', :moourl )
=> "http://moourl.com/fvoky" 
irb(main):005:0> ShortURL.shorten( 'http://www.istwitterdown.com', :tinyurl )
=> "http://tinyurl.com/2t3qmh" 

Using the shorturl command-line tool

Many people don’t know that ShortURL provides a command-line tool, which you can use after installing the gem.


  ~ > shorturl http://istwitterdown.com                                                                                                                                                                                               
  http://rubyurl.com/Lwk

If you’d like to see more services provided than the ones listed here, please submit feature requests and/or patches on the rubyforge project.

ShortURL Documentation

To see the latest documentation for the project, please visit:

My favorite part about this? My rbot plugin for RubyURL works again!

rbot and rubyurl
Uploaded with plasq’s Skitch!

Happy URL-shortening!

RubyURL bookmarklet 2.0

Posted by Tue, 28 Aug 2007 15:51:00 GMT

If you’re using the bookmarklet for RubyURL, you will want to update it with the latest version as there was apparently a bug in the JavaScript and some URLs would fail to redirect properly. Thanks to the help of Jerome, this is now fixed.

So, head over to RubyURL and update your bookmarket. Not sure what I’m talking about? Watch the video.

RubyURL bookmarklet screencast

Posted by Thu, 09 Aug 2007 05:36:00 GMT

I wanted to give Jing a try… so here goes my first screencast with it.

Enjoy!

RubyURL: new design and code base

Posted by Wed, 08 Aug 2007 13:58:00 GMT

Yesterday evening, I deployed the new version of RubyURL. This was a collaborative effort between Chris Griffin and I, which we’re happy to finally push live.

There are a few things that we’re going to push out in near future, such as an API and a new RubyGem.

RubyURL ยป Keep it short (and sweet)

Chris volunteered to work on the new design and I did most of the programming in Ruby on Rails. When we worked on this, we really wanted to keep the process as simple as possible, despite some of the problems that the site has been having.

In the end, we have a Rails application that is only 85 lines of code and has a 1:2.3 code-to-spec ratio. I wanted to keep it under 100 lines of code. This means that there is some breathing room for further development.

We also tried out a beta account that I was given for RoundHaus for Subversion hosting. We had a really good experience using their service and were impressed by the plethora of useful features that came with the repository, such as continuous integration, rcov/code coverage stats, and twitter integration!.

If you find a bug, be sure to submit a ticket on the RubyURL bug tracker.

On a side note, we deployed this on a brand new Rails Boxcar, our new hosting solution that will be launched in the very near future. ;-)

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