Read my latest article: 8 things I look for in a Ruby on Rails app (posted Thu, 06 Jul 2017 17:59:00 GMT)

Oh My Zsh gets theme support

Posted by Mon, 31 Aug 2009 15:00:00 GMT

I just pushed a small change to Oh My Zsh, which gives it rudimentary support for themes. What I’m hoping to do is collect prompts from tons of people and make it simple for others to find a PROMPT that works well for them.

robbyrussell's oh-my-zsh at 2c9f74b5c3f6910e7c66601008e9ddd0444b70c7 - GitHub

As of right now, there are only three for you to choose from. So, please head over to github, fork Oh My Zsh, add your theme, and send a pull request. :-)

zsh /Users/robbyrussell/Projects/development/planetargon/brainstorm 2014 zsh

Once I get it merged in, we’ll get a screenshot of it added to the Oh My Zsh wiki. (see themes)

I know that many of you have some really sweet prompts configured as I got a lot of response with my post, Show me your and I’ll show you mine.

..and on the seventh day, Science created zsh

Posted by Mon, 31 Aug 2009 01:08:00 GMT

Inspired by some recent posts from Tom on zsh, I decided that I’d do my part to help people give it a whirl. I’ve been using zsh for a few years now and haven’t found myself missing bash.

If you’re interested in taking a few minutes to give zsh a while, you’re in luck. I recently reorganized all of my zsh config into a package and tossed it on github to share. My goal was to create a reusable tool that would allow people to get up and running quickly with some of the fun configuration that I’ve come to rely on on a daily basis.

For example:

  • Auto-complete rake and capistrano tasks
  • Git branch names when you’re in a git project directory structure
  • Tons of color highlighting (grep, git, etc.)
  • Sexy prompts.. (so say me)
  • much much more…

I invite you to give Oh My Zsh a whirl, which should take you less than a minute. Just follow the instructions.

Also, Oh My Zsh is Snow Leopard compatible. ;-)

On shells

Posted by Fri, 13 Feb 2009 21:41:00 GMT

Zsh versus Bash. Fight!

OH in developer channel

...because we need another religious war in the developer community. ;-)

(skitch via Gary)

Show me your and I'll show you mine (terminal prompts with git branches)

Posted by Fri, 13 Feb 2009 18:57:00 GMT

I asked on twitter but only got a small handful of responses. So, I’m taking it here.

Show me yours and I’ll show you mine. Your terminal prompt that you’re using. Inspire me with new ideas for my prompt.

Here is mine.

zsh colors

Now… show me yours.

Using MacPorts Ruby and Rails after Upgrading to OS X Leopard

Posted by Sat, 27 Oct 2007 10:43:00 GMT

If you previously followed my article, Installing Ruby on Rails and PostgreSQL on OS X, second edition and are now upgrading to OS X Leopard, you’ll want to make a few adjustments to your setup.

First of all, it’s great that Apple has decided to provide Ruby on Rails out of the box.


~ > gem list rails                                                                                                                                                                   
  *** LOCAL GEMS ***

  rails (1.2.3)
      Web-application framework with template engine, control-flow layer,
      and ORM.
How many gems does it come with?

~ > gem list|grep '^[a-z]'|wc -l                                                                                                                                                     
      29

It’s really great that Apple shipped Leopard pre-installed with 29 gems, especially if you don’t have your entire Rails stack setup already. In my case and for those that have followed my installation process, you don’t need to switch over to this new development stack (yet). I have a lot of time invested in my fully-functionaly MacPorts installation process (PostgreSQL, MySQL, RMagick, Subversion, Git, etc. Since this all working fine on my machine, I’m not ready to make the switch to Apple’s installation.

Don’t Fix it… if it’s not broken!

So, the the first thing that I did was modify my PATH environment variable, which has /usr/bin as the first path that it’ll look at when you try to run commands like ruby, mongrel_rails, gem, etc. You’ll want to modify this and prepend /opt/local/bin: to the front of PATH in your shell configuration. If you’re using bash, this would be… ~/.bashrc. If you’re using zshell like me, ~/.zshrc.

Now, when you start a new Terminal and run gem list, you’ll see all of the gems that you already have installed.


~ > gem list rails                                                                                                                                   < new-host

*** LOCAL GEMS ***

rails (1.2.5, 1.2.4, 1.2.3, 1.1.6)
    Web-application framework with template engine, control-flow layer,
    and ORM.

Back to my happy gems…


~ > gem list|grep '^[a-z]'|wc -l                                                                                                                                                              < new-host
      72

Great! Now I can get back to work and spend time playing with the new features in Finder, Mail.app, and iChat instead of installing all of the software dependencies that our development projects have. :-)

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